Browsers, cookies and search engines

There are over 100 web browsers available today. Knowing a little about browsers is important because they are widely used today.

Macs, PCs and browsers

Browsers are used by most people. It is possible to search a Mac without a web browser, by using Blacktree Quicksilver or Objective Development’s LaunchBar for example, which reduces search engine personalisation. Macs may effectively safeguard against personalisation. Using Blacktree Quicksilver, however, can be unstable just like PC browsers are never perfectly secure from vulnerabilities.

Image of different browser logos.

Photo of browser logos. Source.

Cookies and browsers

It is possible to allow your browser to accept or deny cookies on your device, however, browsers are not recognised as being suitable to do this under EU regulations on cookies. This is why cookie notification bars are widely used today.

Browsers facilitate personalisation because search engines can communicate with browsers and vice versa. This communication allows search engines to build up a profile on your behaviour.

Is Google Chrome safe to use?

Ohngren (2010) found that Google Chrome invades privacy because they monitor browsing behaviour. Awareness helps you to monitor and review your tactics on a regular basis.

Internet Explorer, unlike Google Chrome, offers a tracking protection list option and gives a partial block on third party cookies (for more in-depth reading read reference #2 below).

W3C state that Google Chrome (52.9%) is the most popular web browser whereas Firefox (28.2%) and Internet Explorer (11.8%) are second and third, respectively.

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References

  1. Mlot, S. (2012) Firefox 14 encrypts search; Microsoft browser glitch; AT&T chargin for FaceTime? PC Magazine. pp. 1-1
  2. NSS Labs. (2013) 2013 Browser Security Comparative Analysis: Privacy. [Online] [Accessed on 12th September 2013]
  3. Ohngren, K. (2010) Google Chrome. Entrepreneur. 38(1) pp. 33–33
  4. Reis, C. Barth, A. and Pizano, C. (2009) Browser security: Lessons from Google Chrome. Communications of the ACM. 52(8) pp. 45–49
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